A Guide To Child Development Milestones


Child Development Milestones

These stages are further divided into five-year-olds, seven-year-olds, eight-year-olds and nine-year-olds. It is usually recommended that a child reach at least one of these developmental stages by the age of five, but this can vary depending on the child and their condition. The TDS method can help in determining what these stages are and thus identify any problems that your child might have in this vital stage.

The First Set Of Child Development Milestones

A person wearing a costume

The first set of child development milestones is five-year-olds. Here, your child will be able to grasp and manipulate objects. They will start forming some of their basic senses such as sight, touch and hearing. They will also be able to distinguish colors. By the end of this stage, your child will be able to communicate with others by using spoken words and gestures. At this age, they will also be able to interact with other children.

The next set of child development milestones is seven years. During this period, your child will be ready for elementary school and can begin planning for his or her college life. He or she will be ready to learn how to count, identify colors and shapes and will be able to sit and focus on a task for long periods of time. The key to this milestone is early childhood education or EDE.

The next set of child development milestones is eight years old. At this age, your child will have started to form some of his or her basic senses. He or she will be able to recognize colors, shapes and numbers. He or she will also have developed his or her ability to count. At this point, your child development will have come to a standstill. However, it will not be until the end of the eight-year period that your child will be ready to move into the first year of elementary school.

The next set of child development milestones is nine years old. In this stage, your children learn to express their thoughts in sentences and paragraphs. They are now beginning to learn how to communicate with others through words, pictures and general pointing. They will also be able to distinguish different cultures and will know what is right and wrong. By this time, your children may have already started to develop their visual skills, which will help them in many areas of life.

The next set of child development milestones is eleven years old. This is the age when your children start to show signs of having some of their different gender identity. At this age, your children will begin to understand and express their gender identity. They will also have the ability to think critically about things. And, they will begin to show signs of wanting to fit in with the rest of the kids.

The last set of child development milestones is thirteen years old. At this age, your children will be beginning to develop their motor skills. They will be able to walk, talk and walk correctly. Additionally, they will also be beginning to develop social skills, including how to behave appropriately in social situations. And finally, by this time, your children will be starting to try on their own ideas, and will be trying to make any educational situation more interesting.

Bottom Lines

A little girl sitting next to a body of water

If you want to ensure that your young children do not reach all of the above mentioned developmental milestones too soon, it is important that you take some time and make sure that you understand what each of these milestone means. Also, if your child has some of the other milestone, like being capable of speaking, you may want to wait before moving on to the next level of development. It is also important to understand that young children are very much like little adults, and that it is normal for them to hit a mental barrier in between developmental milestones. Just keep an eye on the goals for your child, and as long as you are patient, there should be no reason why your child won’t be able to reach all of the developmental milestones that you have set for them.

Subscribe to our monthly Newsletter
Subscribe to our monthly Newsletter